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Activists decry amount of chemicals in OR rivers

Every year, Oregon-based industries legally dump hundreds of thousands of pounds of chemicals into the state s waterways, the most coming from a Portland company.A new report, compiled by Environment Oregon, analyzed the amount of chemical waste released annually into Oregon rivers. It took data collected by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2012, the most recent year available.

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Report: Five 'dirty' power plants supplying energy to Oregon

A new survey indicates that while no Oregon power plants are among the nation’s “dirtiest,” energy from five facilities on the list does indeed filter into the state.

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Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

Dangerous Inheritance

As a result of global warming, young Americans today are growing up in a different climate than their parents and grandparents experienced. It is warmer than it used to be. Storms pack more of a punch. Rising seas increasingly flood low-lying land. Large wildfires have grown bigger, more frequent and more expensive to control. People are noticing changes in their own backyards, no matter where they live.

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News Release | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

Portland among nation’s solar leaders

Portland has more solar panels than most major American cities, ranking 18th among dozens of metropolitan areas that were analyzed in a new report. Portland’s spot in the top 20 was owed primarily in part to programs like Solarize Portland and Solar Forward, according to the new Environment Oregon Research and Policy Center report, which provides a comparative look at the growth of solar in major American cities.

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Report | Environment Oregon Research & Policy Center

Shining Cities

The use of solar power is expanding rapidly across the United States. By the end of 2014, the United States had 20,500 megawatts (MW) of cumulative solar electric capacity, enough to power four million average U.S. homes. This success is the outcome of federal, state and local programs that are working in concert to make solar power accessible to more Americans, thereby cleaning our air, protecting our health, and hedging against volatile electricity prices.

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